Thursday, July 12, 2018

Taking on the Tumbler


One quilt block I have always wanted to try is Tumbling Blocks, and when I came upon a tutorial for making them without the dreaded "Y" seams, I knew it was time to give it a try.  The tutorial was by Leah Day and she used the "Sidekick" ruler designed by Julie Herman of Jaybird quilts.

Since I already happened to have a "Sidekick" ruler, I pulled out a few scraps and gave it a try.

The traditional Tumbling Blocks pattern calls for three diamond shaped pieces, but the strip pieced version uses two diamonds and two triangles:

 I decided to experiment with the 2 1/2" size, and sewed my pieces into two vertical strips:

When the strips are sewn together, the Tumbling Blocks magically appear:

Having some success in the 2 1/2" size, I decided to experiment with the 1 1/2" size:

Here are my finished samples side by side:

I have a plan for these adorable little blocks, now that I know how to go about making them. 

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Thursday, July 5, 2018

Child's Play

One way to beat the heat is to stay inside and sew.  I had yet one more panel that I wanted to turn into a small donation quilt.  It was this rainbow bright dinosaur print:

I also had a small amount of a coordinating dinosaur print:

I cut up the panel into smaller pieces, and fussy cut some of the dinosaurs from the coordinating fabric:

I pulled an array of bright colors from the stash, and added some fabric frames to the fussy cuts:

Now it was time for the real fun to begin.  I started with the top row and set it out next to my machine:

I played around with some randomly cut strips and got an idea of what I wanted the finished row to look like:

Then I just started joining adjacent pieces, and trimming off any excess as I went along.  Eventually, the top row looked like this:

I did the same thing to the next three rows:

All that was left was to sew the rows, square up the side edges and add some borders.  Here it how it ended up.
The edges are droopy because they extend beyond my little design board, 
but I assure you they are flat. 

I had such a fun time putting this together.  And all the while, I had steak tips slowly simmering in the crockpot and potato salad cooling in the refrigerator.  Not exactly your average Fourth of July, but I'll take it.


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Friday, June 29, 2018

One panel = Two quilts

Here is the panel I started with:

and here is what was left of it  after making the "Tutu Fairy" quilt described in my previous post:

I knew that there was another quilt hiding in there somewhere, and I still had a yard of fabric printed with small castles:


With castles being the main theme, I started with the six castle blocks in the panel:

I liked the narrow borders of red and pink on the top row, so instead of trimming them off to match the size of the castles in the bottom row, I decided to add narrow borders to the castles in the bottom row:

My red and pink fabrics were not perfect matches, but I think they did the trick:

Now that I had the castles figured out, I did the same border treatment to the last four panel motifs:

Then I turned my attention to the star strips:

They were not long enough to use as is, so I combined them into two longer strips, and added multiple narrow strips to widen them a little bit:

Now I had all the ingredients to sew up a small quilt:

The coordinating castle fabric made the perfect border.  Here is the before and after:





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Saturday, June 23, 2018

Dancing with the Tutu Fairy



 A while back I bought this cute panel called "Tutu Fairy".

It was intended to be made into a pocketed wallhanging, but I thought I would turn it into a Quilt for Kids donation.  I had also purchased some of the coordinating fabrics:

I started out by cutting out the six "tutu fairies" and giving them a uniform, pink border:

Then I chose 6 of the smaller motifs to cut out and border with one of the coordinating fabrics:

I set the blocks together on my design board to see how they looked:

Cute, but rather small, since the blocks were only 6.5 inches wide.  I decided to give each type of block another border.  The tutu fairies got a basic white:

and the other blocks got a teal green:

When I put them together, it looked like this:

Now it just needed a few borders.  I wanted to include the pink ballet slipper fabric from the coordinates, so that became the first  border.  Then a skinny dark pink border, and at last, a border of the tutu fabric.


Ta-Da!  A quick and easy quilt that I hope a little ballerina will love.  The turquoise castle fabric will be used with the castles in the panel to make a second quilt.





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